Wednesday, 28 April 2010

Exclusive Interview With Robert E. McGinnis

Q: How did the producers of the Bond movies got in touch with you for the "Thunderball" poster artwork?
A: “Through recommendation of Don Smolen, an artist/designer working at United Artists in New York City who knew of my work.”


Q: What kind of briefing or input did you receive? Photos, source material etc?

A: “Attending screenings of rushes in a New York theater. Then sent to England on location – access provided to black-and-white movie stills.”


Q: How much time did you have to create the artwork?

A: “Three to four weeks.”


Q: Can you describe the creative process in terms of composition, choice of colors etc?

A: “Art directors (United Artists) Freddie Goldberg and Don Smolen provided rough-sketch concepts and direction.”


Q: What materials do you use? (Temepera, Gouache, pencils etc…)

A: “Winsor-Newton designer colors (gouache); Shiva Casein White; Prismacolor black pencil.”


Q: What was the most fun part of creating the Thunderball artworks?
A: “Seeing the printed posters, five stories high on buildings along Times Square in New York City.”


Q: Any special anecdote associated with this artwork?
A: “On location in the great hall dining room of an English manor house. We were seated for lunch, a hush came over the crowd; appearing, dressed in black and flanked by two beauties was Sean Connery. He joined our United Artists table. Frank and I were introduced – he was a true gentleman!”


Q: Do you know what happened to the original of the artworks?

A: “They were owned by United Artists and secretly drifted away.”

Thank you for the interview, also to Kyle for his help!

5 comments:

Leighton Johns said...

Congratulations on getting an interview with the man himself! Its good to get a definitive answer to what the great man used in terms of art materials. Also love what looks like a photo of the underground/subway version of the poster. Any idea where that was taken?

Frank Turner said...

Man that times square photo is great, any chance of a higher rez version, hell ANY McGinnis pics are always worth seeing, his work is legendary.

Peter Lorenz said...

@ Leighton: The subway poster is from a New York subway in 1965 as far as I know but not 100% sure.

@ Frank: Sorry to admit: It's a montage and not real :-(
I've been searching all over the place to find one but without success.

Jason Whiton said...

fantastic!

Joerg said...

Thanks again for a short but interesting interview. A rare opportunity.
It's unbelievable how many original poster artworks were lost or have vanished. It seems that Mr McGinnis has a sense of humor about it.